The human visual cognition process


Architecture

Architecture (Photo credit: blmiers2)

The human visual cognition process/
create a place

Three-dimensional visualization has been employed extensively by architects as a medium for explaining architectural concepts since the availability of computer-aided design. It has been proved to be a far more effective communication technique compared with the conventional methods such as technical drawings and lexical documentation. However, the reason why three-dimensional visualization is better than the other techniques has not been explicitly examined.
problems in the current architectural communication process. It starts with the discussion of the problem of the current communication methods used in architectural design followed by the discussion of the popular communication theory. After that, the human visual cognition process is studied to find the solution to the current architectural communication issues.
At the end, we three-dimensional architectural visualization as a solution to improve the current architectural communication method.

3d communication
An ascetic essay from 1966 called ‘Planners’ People’ proves that planners had always aroused suspicion from those who questioned their objectivity. In this case criticism came from within their own profession. The authors – professional town-planners – asked why it was that planners’ drawings for downtown development schemes were always populated with the same ‘stock-cast ‘of six characters. These were always white, upper middle-class, law-abiding, cultured, and professional – just like the planners themselves.
They concluded that included only those ‘types’ amenable to their own ideals of urban living and overlooked the true heterogeneity of the city. Nevertheless, they placed these ‘stock characters’ in real urban vistas, to lend them credibility.
In his paper ‘Creating places or designing spaces?’ Jonathan Dime considers the process of ‘place making’ and tests the degree to which an architect can design a place’ independently of the people who will actually use it.
He argues that while modern architecture has concentrated on the properties of geometric space, psychology has neglected to look at the physical context of behavior. He concludes, not surprisingly, that we can not create a place.

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ASIAN ARTIST-MARCELO


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masterpieces of thirteenth-century Persian miniaturists


 

One Thousand and One Nights

One Thousand and One Nights (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

The decoration of this fine Saljuk

pottery consists mostly of figure subjects, such as horsemen, seated and

standing figures of courtiers and princes, hunting scenes, and sphinxes. Three

of the outstanding bowls in the Schiff collection are decorated with the story

of BahramGur and his lute-player Azadah.

 

This popular theme

of Persian art is narrated in the epic poem the Shahnamab y

Firdausi. In two of our bowls two consecutive episodes of the story are repre-sented

simultaneously. BahramGur is shown transfixing with a single arrow the hind hoof and

ear of a deer, and the same scene includes the death of Azadah,

who, after making a mockery of BahramGur’s

skill, was thrown from the saddle and trampled to death.

 

These three bowls in

the Schiff collection are masterpieces of thirteenth-century Persian

miniaturists and are related to contemporary paintings in manu-scripts

of the Baghdad school. Through the generosity of Mr. and Mrs. A. Wallace

Chauncey the Museum received as a gift fifteen Persian and Mesopotamian

ceramics and two Syrian enameled glass beakers, from the Henry G. Leberthon

collection.

 

There are three outstanding examples of twelfth-century lusterware

from Rakka with elaborate arabesque designs and decorative writing.

Another im-portant piece is a thirteenth-century albarello

with painted decoration in white and gold on a cobalt blue background.

 

The albarello

shape, which originated in the East, was adopted later by Italian potters.

Several examples of later Persian ware of the sixteenth and seventeenth

centuries belong to the so-called Kubatcha group, with

decoration consisting of plants and figures in monochrome or polychrome. This

ware, although found in Kubatcha in the Cau-casus,

should be regarded as Persian and was probably made in the region of Tabriz.

 

 

 

 

 

the miniature repre-senting the pilgrimage of Adam


The artists working for the Timurids were responsible for the development of a true national style of Persian painting. Shah Rukh (1404-1447) and his son Baisunkur Mirza were great patrons of the arts of the book. One of the earliest Timurid paintings in the Burnett collection represents a pair of lovers in a garden, probably Humay and Humayun. It is unusually large, measuring I9 Y by 12 9/6 inches, and comes from the same manuscript of Rashid ad-Din’s Jami at-Tawarikh, or “Universal History,” as the Jonah and the Whale in the Metropolitan Mu-seum. This work of the famous Mongol historian and vizier of emperors Ghazan and Uljaitu re-mained popular under the Timurids. Several Timurid miniatures in the Burnett Be-quest came from another copy of the Jami at- Tawarikh which can also be dated in the period of Shah Rukh. Here, as in the miniature repre-senting the pilgrimage of Adam, the Timurid style is fully developed. Of particular interest is the treatment of the landscape with spongy mountains that appears in so many Timurid paintings of the fifteenth century. Another Timurid miniature in this collection is a rare painting on silk. Only very few Persian silk paintings are in existence. One is in the Boston Museum and another one was formerly in the collection of Countess de Behague in Paris. The Burnett painting represents a garden scene with two lovers.

SEEING THE CITY AS PALIMPSEST – PART III


The artists working for the Timurids were responsible for the development of a true national style of Persian painting. were great patrons of the arts of the book. One of the earliest Timurid paintings in the Burnett collection represents a pair of lovers in a garden, probably Humay and Humayun. It is unusually large, measuring I9 Y by 12 9/6 inches, and comes from the same manuscript of Rashid ad-Din’s Jami at-Tawarikh, or “Universal History,” as the Jonah and the Whale in the Metropolitan Mu-seum.

and those were the reasons

brunswickcroydonmiso-greeve-st

The peeling paste-up

ONE OF THE MOST POPULAR forms of street art in Melbourne is the paste-up: printed or drawn posters adhered to city walls with a wheat-based glue. The physical insubstantiality of paste-ups renders them particularly ephemeral — they do not have the ‘sticking power’ of paint — yet this also makes them particularly ‘active’ components of the city footprint. The effects of time and human interface are readily wrought upon their surface. Older paste-ups peel away from the walls on which they are stuck; new ones are pasted over them, perhaps in turn to be painted over by following artists, tagged by graffitists, or torn down by council cleaning teams. For artist Miso, the traces of the ‘life’ of the poster are part of its appeal as an art form:

There is a certain excitement in nature and the city reclaiming that piece and the way people interact…

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