“We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we…


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Weekend Video: Create the Future You Imagine


Life Out of the Box

We love this video because it emphasizes that everyone has the potential to create the future that they dream of no matter where you come from. It states that success is not given to only the lucky few, but rather that many of the most successful world changing people had to work hard and struggle in order to crate the impact they made. Bottom line is, anyone can accomplish what they want through hard work, dedication and passion. This is something that we’ve always believed and is a big reason why we left everything we knew to create something all the way out here in Central America that could make an impact on the world around us. It continues to motivate us every step of the way and we want you all to know that you can do anything you dream of too. We hope that this video gives you…

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The human visual cognition process


Architecture

Architecture (Photo credit: blmiers2)

The human visual cognition process/
create a place

Three-dimensional visualization has been employed extensively by architects as a medium for explaining architectural concepts since the availability of computer-aided design. It has been proved to be a far more effective communication technique compared with the conventional methods such as technical drawings and lexical documentation. However, the reason why three-dimensional visualization is better than the other techniques has not been explicitly examined.
problems in the current architectural communication process. It starts with the discussion of the problem of the current communication methods used in architectural design followed by the discussion of the popular communication theory. After that, the human visual cognition process is studied to find the solution to the current architectural communication issues.
At the end, we three-dimensional architectural visualization as a solution to improve the current architectural communication method.

3d communication
An ascetic essay from 1966 called ‘Planners’ People’ proves that planners had always aroused suspicion from those who questioned their objectivity. In this case criticism came from within their own profession. The authors – professional town-planners – asked why it was that planners’ drawings for downtown development schemes were always populated with the same ‘stock-cast ‘of six characters. These were always white, upper middle-class, law-abiding, cultured, and professional – just like the planners themselves.
They concluded that included only those ‘types’ amenable to their own ideals of urban living and overlooked the true heterogeneity of the city. Nevertheless, they placed these ‘stock characters’ in real urban vistas, to lend them credibility.
In his paper ‘Creating places or designing spaces?’ Jonathan Dime considers the process of ‘place making’ and tests the degree to which an architect can design a place’ independently of the people who will actually use it.
He argues that while modern architecture has concentrated on the properties of geometric space, psychology has neglected to look at the physical context of behavior. He concludes, not surprisingly, that we can not create a place.

ASIAN ARTIST-MARCELO


<div style=”margin-bottom:5px”> <strong> <a href=”http://www.slideshare.net/GianAlcantara/marcelo-hilario-del-pilar-y-lagman&#8221; title=”Marcelo hilario del pilar” target=”_blank”>Marcelo hilario del pilar</a> </strong> from <strong><a href=”http://www.slideshare.net/GianAlcantara&#8221; target=”_blank”>Gian Alcantara</a></strong> </div>

How to Get Paid What You’re Worth


Bethenny Frankel at the Virgin America OC Launch.

 

How to Get Paid What You’re Worth

 

1. Negotiate your salary upfront
According to Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg, 57 percent of men entering the workforce negotiate their salaries, while only 7 percent of women do. That’s a shocking disparity. And before anyone starts to think that one’s very first job isn’t the right time to negotiate, let’s look at the implications.

 

According to the authors of Women Don’t Ask, Linda Babcock and Sara Laschever, by not negotiating her first job offer, a woman sacrifices more than half a million dollars over the course of her career. They write: “This is a massive loss for a one-time negotiation-for avoiding what is usually no more than five minutes of discomfort-and it’s an unnecessary loss, because most employers expect people to negotiate and therefore offer less than they’re prepared to pay.”

 

Before entering a negotiation, get a sense of salaries for someone in your position and geographical area. Search online to find average salaries. Don’t be afraid to ask for more than you think you can get. This is the time to be your own advocate. Chances are even if your requested amount is flat-out denied, the initial offer will still be there. And it’s better to ask and not receive, than just settle for less than you deserve by never asking in the first place.

 

Related: What We Can Learn from Bethenny Frankel

 

2. Don’t undervalue yourself: the entitlement effect
A Harvard Business School article discussed some of the reasons why women walk into negotiations with lower expectations than men. Hannah Riley Bowles, an Associate Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School, discussed the entitlement effect, where men have been conditioned to believe they are entitled and consequently negotiate better conditions for themselves.

 

According to Bowles, “… if you bring men and women into the lab and you say either one of two things: ‘Work until you think you’ve earned the $10 we just gave you,’ or ‘Work and then tell us how much you think you deserve,’ the women work longer hours with fewer errors for comparable pay, and pay themselves less for comparable work. But if there’s a standard [that men and women know], then this result goes away.”

 

DAVOS/SWITZERLAND, 28JAN11 - Sheryl Sandberg, ...

DAVOS/SWITZERLAND, 28JAN11 – Sheryl Sandberg, Chief Operating Officer, Facebook, USA; Young Global Leader are captured during the session ‘Handling Hyper-connectivity’ at the Annual Meeting 2011 of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, January 28, 2011. Copyright by World Economic Forum swiss-image.ch/Photo by Jolanda Flubacher (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

3. Be your own advocate throughout your career
Outside of the negotiating room, women need to stay visible, pursuing raises, opportunities, and assignments that they think they deserve. Nurtured to be modest and humble, women often downplay their accomplishments, while men can be more comfortable highlighting their achievements in order to advance.

 

Related: How Women Compete with Men in the Workplace

 

With humility, you can keep your accomplishments and skills front and center. If there’s an opportunity that sounds perfect for you, don’t wait to be recognized, ask for that prestigious assignment.