Op art-optical ART


Love05

Love05 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

After pop art it was op art a short term for optical art
Expressed itself with reduced geometrical forms sometimes in black and white or very brilliant color
Hungarian born prominent artist was Vassily
op art

Roy Lichtenstein's Drowning Girl (1963), adapt...

Roy Lichtenstein’s Drowning Girl (1963), adapted from the lead story in Secret Hearts #83, lettered by Schnapp. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

nemculture.

 

nPop art at times targeted a broad audience 

 

art+thoughts – color harmony


Gebre Kristos Desta
Gebre Kristos Desta was fully involved in abstract art until he become again interested in Expressionism and Abstract Expressionism. He was the most important artist to experiment with abstract or non-figurative art and was able to develop a consistent style.
fabric of GebreKristos could only be comprehended with our understanding of modermismas a theme which German expression was part and parcel of.
He depicts his thoughts with complete color harmony and by drawing simplistic circles and lines. as one of the best abstract artists ever.
He worked on the social and intellectual context
In the 60th which he produced most of his works was the golden age of Ethiopian art.
Gebre Kristos Desta was fully involved in abstract art until he become again interested in Expressionism and Abstract Expressionism. He was the most important artist to experiment with abstract or non-figurative art and was able to develop a consistent style.  fabric of GebreKristos could only be comprehended with our understanding of modermismas a theme which German expression was part and parcel of. He depicts his thoughts with complete color harmony and by drawing simplistic circles and lines. as one of the best abstract artists ever.  He worked on the social and intellectual context  In the 60th which he produced most of his works was the golden age of Ethiopian art.

pinpoint the expression of inner experience -Expressionism!!!


Is a movement in French painting from
(late 1860s – late 1890s) sometimes called optical realism
of its almost scientific interest in the actual visual experience and effect of light and movement on appearance of objects.
Impressionism
Impressionist fascination with light and movement was at the core of their art
Exposure to light and/or movement was enough to create a

justifiable and fit artistic subject out of literally anything.

Expressionistic
Expressionism developed during the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
. Expressionist were trying to pinpoint the expression of inner experience rather than solely

realistic portrayal, seeking to depict not objective reality but the subjective emotions and

responses that objects and events arouse in them.

versatile and disciplined artist-Afewerk!!!


"Coronation of Emperor Haile Selassie I&q...

“Coronation of Emperor Haile Selassie I” by Maître Afewerk Tekle, 1960 (Photo credit: A.Davey)

Afewerk

Afewerk
has mastered not only numerous media but has also shown ability to select the style most appropriate to his theme. He has not made a dogma of realism, symbolism, or abstract art, or of any other “ism” for that matter, but has used all of these approaches with imagination
when Africans were fighting for their independence and working for the unity of the continent Afewerk contributed in his works.
His paintings included titles such as “Backbones of African Civilization” “African Movement”, “African Atmosphere” and “African Unity”, and for Expo 67 in Montreal, Canada, “Africa’s Heritage” which in now in the permanent collection of the National Museum of Ethiopia.

In 1964 he became the first winner of the HaileSellassie I
Prize for Fine Arts.The citation
described
him as a “versatile and discipline
d artist”.And the prize was awarded “for h
is outstanding drawings,
paintings, landscapes, and portraits
which eloquently ex
press his particular
world environment, and for his
contribution in being among the
first to introduce contemporary
techniques to Ethiopian subject matter and content

He was awarded the highest order of “Hero of Peace and Friendship”, and was recognized as the most significant and serious twentieth century artist from the African

Afewerk

BIRDS OF THE SAME FEATHERS FLY 2 GET HER  JOIN US FOR TARGETED PROJECTS-STUDIES delight the community whom it exists to serve;  to fulfill their needs,  and to improve their quality of life.  DECLARING that knowing the path to the end users lies through the using of SPACE.ART.NATURE.COMMUNICATION        GET YOUR OWN  expression ,inspiration, motivation, -thought-idea-art-design  realizes the importance of education ,DISSCUSION,COMMUNICATION-INNOVATION-CONSERVATION  and we take pride in being able to offer you  -VISIONARY KEYNOTES-ARTICLES,           INTERACTIVE PRESENTATIONS,TAKEAWAY TIPS&GUIDES AND MUCH MORE!!! •	Art Vs Architecture /Arts are having two modes of representation: Visual Arts & Performing Arts •	Communication is an important aspect of arts than ARCHITECTURE and architectural theory  •	has often borrowed imagery or made analogy (similarity in some way) to these arts.  •	           We can discuss theses in particular: Drawing         NATURE     LITERATURE   Dance     Music •	All these arts may be seen in terms of a language used for communication.                 envisions that being a dynamic and innovative in the  design and BUILT UP ENVIROMENT.       It will be distinguished as that listens and delivers the almost in personalized service. It will be financially successful, socially responsible, and commercially prominent – and  PUT its foot print in the industry  for the free era.         We began with educating communities about climate change and the health and cost benefits of energy efficiency.  Through each subsequent recovery project, we have evolved that approach to become one that we think of as a  “collaborative dialogue of discovery,” which is created through facilitated community conversations   (face to face and through social networking). The business purposes   :-To carry on leadership development, construction, processing, and promotion       To INNOVATE CREATIVITY STYLE ART  WITH  takeaway TIPS  articles, newsletters & e-books-publications       To carry on any other business which may seem to the capable of being connection with any business of yours,   lets render profit, serve our community, share skills& experiences ,TO BUILD  THE CITES OF TOMMORROW ARCHI Contact: Tel : +2510935353698         +25109365941      +00447538044802 Email :ARCHIADDIS@HOTMAIL.COM             ARCHIABYSSINIA.gmail.com Web Site: http://archiabyssina.com         Vision: Achieving educational collaborative dialogue quality through versatile academic research programs, qualified and competent individuals and strong successful partnerships. Mission: Achieving distinction in the fields of literature and humanities within a framework of an educational research milieu that contributes to developing society and maintaining its identity. Majors: The faculty includes ALL WHO ARE LEAD THERE DAILY LIFE WITH ART AND THOUGHT  in different disciplines of humanities, social sciences and literature. Unique Features: Contributing to activities of educational, academic and cultural bodies concerned with the development of NEW AGE society.

the out side world to study art


Wenceslas Hollar - Say and Sele

Wenceslas Hollar – Say and Sele (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Modernization of Ethiopian Art is not totally with the influence of the out side world but it was a kind of integrated. It is the gradual integration of the ancient teaching methods with that of the newly introduced teachings of the out side world (with students sent to the out side world to study art).

At historical context. Sele, which means “art,” has a long history in the country. Thus anybody wanting to do Sele required an art education of some kind.

An art education had existed in the nation for several centuries; the church school system prepared scholars, known as Arat-Ayna (Four-Eyed Ones) who were also artists. Considered as scholars and as masters of the arts of traditional instruction and scholarship.

The concept of modernizing Ethiopian art education was born as part of the overall modernizing of Ethiopia, which began during the second part of the 19th century. This was a period that saw the beginnings of unification, military reform, the birth of fairly well developed literary Amharic, and the establishment of schools

we set the clock of the modernization of art education in 1887. This was when the church trained artists; self-taught artists from all around the nation were lured to Entoto

LANDSCAPE PAINT
Atse Menelik decided to send Afewerk Gebre Yesus to study art in Europe
In less than a quarter of a century, the art modernization movement shifted from its center in Entoto to Addis Ababa in part and to its primary center in Arat Kilo.
In the 1940s, the modern art movement began to bloom with the works of Ethiopian artists like, first with Abebe Wolde Giorgis, Agegnehu Engeda a Zerihun Dominique, and then.
In the 1960s a new trend in art occupied the minds of Ethiopian artist. Like Ale Felege Selam, Skunder Bogossian, Gebrekirstos desta, Maitre Artist Afework Tekele  and others lead the trend and introduced new modern forms of visual creativity into Ethiopian art.
ETHIOPIAN PAINT
Ethiopian art in the mid 1980s reflected the composition of Ethiopian life more than a decade into the 1974 revolution: what is modern in it derived for better or worse from the ideas and inventions of both eastern and western Europe. What is Ethiopian in it adhered to a traditional be designed by political and economic realities.
After the revolution of 1974, international socialist realism of officially displaced the remnants of modernism that had begun to influence the painting of student at the fine arts school in A.A in the 1960s
LANDSCAPE PAINT

Some of the influential artists for the modernization of Ethiopian art are
ETHIOPIAN ARTISTS

paintings of Skunder Boghossian


paintings of Skunder Boghossian are deeply expressive in a spiritual way where art is

An abstract expressionist painting by Jane Fra...

An abstract expressionist painting by Jane Frank (1918-1986): Crags and Crevices, 1961 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

more than a language spoken.
Skunder has inspired and left a powerful impact on a generation of students that were in AASFA.
To him, tuning traditional Ethiopian art to the universal reality was inescapable.
The style, surrealism some called it; abstract expressionism others.

 

 

AFRICAN ART
paintings of Skunder Boghossian
paintings of Skunder Boghossian

Art is not totally with the influence of the out side world


Untitled (Interior with choir screen, unidenti...

Untitled (Interior with choir screen, unidentified English church) (Photo credit: Cornell University Library)

 

The values of Art

 

Material valueCARLOS TOUCH
Intrinsic value
Depends on the general assessment of an artist and the esthetic character of his or her work.
Religious value.
Nationalistic value
The pride and accomplishment of a culture.
Psychological value

 
PAINTWOMEN OF HARAR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Modernization of Ethiopian Art is not totally with the influence of the out side world but it was a kind of integrated. It is the gradual integration of the ancient teaching methods with that of the newly introduced teachings of the out side world (with students sent to the out side world to study art).

 

 

why there are different design cultures


why there are different design cultures in different schools of architecture and offices.

It will introduce the idea that there are different – though often ETHIOPIAN PAINT

related – aesthetic, theoretical and professional communities within the

discipline of architecture, which have different ways of valuing visual,

textual and three-dimensional communication.

It will also suggest that some of these design cultures are sometimes

perceived to be more powerful and influential than others, so that some architectural

aesthetics, theories and practices receive greater attention and recognition!!!

ART TOURISTS


Landscape at Collioure, Oil on canvas. In the ...

Landscape at Collioure, Oil on canvas. In the collection of the MOMA. 38.8 x 46.6 cm (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Open Window, Collioure (1905, Henri Matisse) i...

Open Window, Collioure (1905, Henri Matisse) inside the National Gallery of Art’s East Building in Washington, D.C. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Woman Reading, Oil on canvas. In the Cone coll...

Woman Reading, Oil on canvas. In the Cone collection of the Museum of Modern Art, Paris (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

These days we are unlikely to be quite that opinionated about drawing. Few would want to
explain why a drawing was outrageously bad – you chuckle knowing that it is meant to be
like that. The most impressive drawing show that I have seen in recent years was the Polke
exhibition at MOMA in 1999, and if I think of it as ‘creative’ it is because of its fearless,
searching energy – from a scrawl in a private sketchbook to a vast Spiderman fantasy. I
wonder what Matisse would have made of it. Would he have sensed an underlying
competence, a discipline? Or a degenerate, diseased mind?
For generations of nervous art students the key to getting onto a good course was the portfolio of drawings. The interview panel would leaf through these in silence.

If they weren’t up to scratch no amount of smart talk would get you through. It wasn’t just about ability or perseverance or ‘being able to draw’ – that could mean quite different things to different people.

Drawing was the touchstone, outside of fashion, beyond argument, the
foundation of art.

Whole cultures were categorized by their use of line and form, some
pure and classic, some degenerate, confused. According to Ruskin, half the National
Gallery was well below par and would do the student serious educational damage: we
should look at Rembrandt and Michelangelo in moderation in case we picked up bad
habits.

It may now sound nutty to dismiss whole periods of art history and drawing, but
perhaps we are no better. We have become art tourists, afraid to make any noise that might cause embarrassment. We are there to appreciate, to consume uncritically. We look, but not too hard!!

Michelangelo’s ‘architectural theory’


Architectural discourse from the illustrated F...

Architectural discourse from the illustrated French Dictionary of Architecture (1856) by Eugène Viollet-le-Duc (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The relationship of Michelangelo’s ‘architectural theory’ to his working

methods leads James Ackerman to study his drawings and models

and to conclude that he made a
fundamental critique of architectural composition undertaken in drawing lines instead of
volumes and mass. ‘From the start’, Ackerman, suggests, ‘he dealt with qualities rather
than quantities. In choosing ink washes and chalk rather than pen, he evoked the quality
of stone, and the most tentative sketches are likely to contain indications of light and
shadow; the observer is there before the building is designed
sketch
This determination to locate himself inside a space which he was imagining was a direct critique of the early
Renaissance theories of architecture which emphasized ideal mathematical proportions
based upon a perfect image of a human body, rather than the experience our bodies offer
us in movement in space4 . ‘… Michelangelo directed (criticism) against the
contemporary system of figural proportion. It emphasized the unit and failed to
take into account the effect of the character of forms brought about by movement
in architecture, the movement of the observer through and around buildings and
by environmental conditions, especially, light. It could produce a paper
architecture more successful on the drawing board than in three dimensions
JJ

Michelangelo WAY


Michelangelo - Femminilita II

Michelangelo – Femminilita II (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Art image the portrait of Michelangel...

English: Art image the portrait of Michelangelo on the Façade of the National Arts Club in New York , sculpted by New York Artist Sergio Rossetti Morosini.http://brownstonearts.com/ (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Michelangelo Buonarroti

Michelangelo Buonarroti (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Sol pur col foco il fabbro il ferro’
(Only fire forges iron/to match the beauty shaped within the mind)
Michelangelo, Sonnet 62’1
The architectural drawings of Michelangelo depict spaces and parts of buildings, often
staircases and archways or desks, and on the same sheet of paper he also drew fragments
of human figures, arms, legs, torsos, heads, etc. I believe that this suggests his concern
for the actual lived experience of human situations and reveals the primary importance of
corporeality and perception in his work. Michelangelo was less concerned with making
buildings look like human bodies, and with the implied relationship this had in the
Renaissance with divine geometry and cosmology. I contend that his drawing practice
reveals his concerns for the relationships between the material presence of phenomena
and the articulation of ideas and forms which he considered to be latent within places,
situations and things.
Michelangelo criticized the contemporary practice of replicating building designs
regardless of their situation. The emphasis Alberti placed upon design drawings relegated
construction to the carrying out of the architect’s instructions, and drawings were used to
establish geometrical certainty and perfection.

Michelangelo believed that ‘where the plan is entirely changed in form, it is not only permissible but necessary in consequence
entirely to change the adornments and likewise their corresponding portions; the means
are unrestricted (and may be chosen) at will (or: as adornments require)’.2 In
emphasizing choice, Michelangelo recovers the process of design from imitation and
interpretation of the classical canon, and instead celebrates human attributes such as
intuition and perception as essential to creativity.

Tantalize our curiosity with Sketch


Mirror Drawing

Mirror Drawing (Photo credit: Dru!)

by Pablo Picasso, 1910, Oil on canvas, 45 5/8 ...

by Pablo Picasso, 1910, Oil on canvas, 45 5/8 x 45 5/8 inches. In the collection of the Art Institute of Chicago. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Lay people enjoy examining working drawings associated with recognizable works of art as they feel they can be ‘in on’ the magical and secret world that is the mind of the artist.
Recent advertising campaigns for cars, computers and sportswear have included reference, with much artistic license, to the lengths a designer goes to create the most desirable products for us to buy. This allows insight into the sophisticated process leading to the purchase we are about to make.
All drawing is a serious business. How naive to think that the simple and minimal line placed on a page by Picasso, or the slick Leicester Square caricature of a tourist, were achieved without the backing of hours, days, weeks of ‘practice’. If drawing is something we can learn, then why do girls around the age of ten and boys at about fourteen give it up as something they feel they cannot do? No matter how ‘good’ or ‘bad’ a drawing is, the knowledge that it can always go a step further is perhaps the crux of the continued and
rapidly expanding debate about drawing and its place in art, design, media and communication practice. In China it is common, in fact essential, that young art students perfect figure drawing before moving onto the next stage of creativity, basic design and compositional exercises. Using imagination or drawing without academic purpose is fact from being on the agenda at the beginning of their studies. Here, in the western world, we encourage imaginative originality in drawing with little reference to skill or academic
correctness. Two very different approaches of thinking and of drawing.
The aesthetic qualities of drawing are as difficult to pin down as the ‘perfect’ drawing is.
Equally elusive are the aesthetic qualities of drawing as part and parcel of the creative
process as witnessed in the sketchbooks, working drawings, plans and diagrams of
practitioners in any discipline. Frequently drawing alludes to a world neither yet discovered
nor understood, typified by the blackboard drawings of Rudolph Steiner or the mathematics of Professor Roger Penrose. In this way drawing can tantalize our curiosity, feed our imagination and offer new
ideas to our own work