why there are different design cultures


why there are different design cultures in different schools of architecture and offices.

It will introduce the idea that there are different – though often ETHIOPIAN PAINT

related – aesthetic, theoretical and professional communities within the

discipline of architecture, which have different ways of valuing visual,

textual and three-dimensional communication.

It will also suggest that some of these design cultures are sometimes

perceived to be more powerful and influential than others, so that some architectural

aesthetics, theories and practices receive greater attention and recognition!!!

DIAMONDS FACETS


· IN A CHAPTER ‘THE OBLIGATIONS TOWARDS THE DIFFICULT WHOLE’,
VENTURI CALLED FOR “THE DIFFICULT UNITY THROUGH INCLUSION RATHER THAN THE EASY UNITY THROUGH EXCLUSION”.

· THE IDEA NATURALLY LED TO CONCEPTS OF VARIETY AND THE OPPOSITION BETWEEN ELEMENTS, VENTURI WROTE,
“EQUILIBIRIUM MUST BE CREATED OUT OF OPPOSITES”.
WE MIGHT THINK OF HIS RESIDENCE IN CHESTNUT HILL OF 1962 WHICH “ALMOST EQUALLY COMBINES RECTANGULAR, DIANGONAL AND CURVING ELEMENTS”.

· THE CONCEPT OF HARMONY, LE CORBUSIER’S WORDS ON ESTABLISHING SPIRITUAL HARMONY BETWEEN PEOPLE AND THEIR ENVIRONMENT.

· For Example LOUIS KAHN WHO WROTE “MAN’S FIRST SENSE MUST HAVE BEEN BEAUTY, A SENSE OF TOTAL HARMONY”.

 

GREEN BEHAVIOUR


Richard Whitehall is an industrial designer and partner at Smart Design where he works to design what he calls “responsible behaviour”. I found this great article, , where you can see exactly what goes on daily at this industrial designer’s desk.
I like this article because within it are some gems that might help you design places for better occupant interactions. Here are some of his ideas that I think make his designs successful — really promoting green human behaviour…
1 — Persuade people through cues.
2 — It’s important to observe people using a product or design. The way they say they use them is often not how they use them. Plus, your view as a designer may be entirely different than their view. You should consider both.
3 — Go for changing “small practices” with your design. All of these will eventually add up and make a big difference.
4 — Use texture, instead of adding more materials to get a “decorative effect”
5 — Aim to “optimize the efficiency” of a user.
6 — An idea is to create a feedback loop so you can encourage a person to continue or stop certain habits.
7 — Focus on “experiences and systems” so you can understand how “people interact with objects and information”.
8 — Don’t just build products that are, themselves, sustainable. Build products that change people’s behaviours.
9 — Discouraging behaviours can also be as important as encouraging them.
10 — Look at what is currently on the market and find ways to make them better.