The human visual cognition process


Architecture

Architecture (Photo credit: blmiers2)

The human visual cognition process/
create a place

Three-dimensional visualization has been employed extensively by architects as a medium for explaining architectural concepts since the availability of computer-aided design. It has been proved to be a far more effective communication technique compared with the conventional methods such as technical drawings and lexical documentation. However, the reason why three-dimensional visualization is better than the other techniques has not been explicitly examined.
problems in the current architectural communication process. It starts with the discussion of the problem of the current communication methods used in architectural design followed by the discussion of the popular communication theory. After that, the human visual cognition process is studied to find the solution to the current architectural communication issues.
At the end, we three-dimensional architectural visualization as a solution to improve the current architectural communication method.

3d communication
An ascetic essay from 1966 called ‘Planners’ People’ proves that planners had always aroused suspicion from those who questioned their objectivity. In this case criticism came from within their own profession. The authors – professional town-planners – asked why it was that planners’ drawings for downtown development schemes were always populated with the same ‘stock-cast ‘of six characters. These were always white, upper middle-class, law-abiding, cultured, and professional – just like the planners themselves.
They concluded that included only those ‘types’ amenable to their own ideals of urban living and overlooked the true heterogeneity of the city. Nevertheless, they placed these ‘stock characters’ in real urban vistas, to lend them credibility.
In his paper ‘Creating places or designing spaces?’ Jonathan Dime considers the process of ‘place making’ and tests the degree to which an architect can design a place’ independently of the people who will actually use it.
He argues that while modern architecture has concentrated on the properties of geometric space, psychology has neglected to look at the physical context of behavior. He concludes, not surprisingly, that we can not create a place.

Photographic memories


Raindrops and Lollipops

old photo

Anyone with clinical depression who has been told to ‘think positive’ and ‘remember the good times’ will know the creepy, forced smile you offer the purveyor of said well meaning sentiments. Because trying to explain to anyone that actually has access to the happy part of their brain that you don’t really want to be miserable, you’ve just lost the ability to feel good, is like being repeatedly slapped in the face with a trout.

Depression is a negativity dump truck, unloading its toxic cargo of sad thoughts, self doubt and unpleasant memories into your cranium every hour of the day. The reason sufferers can’t just focus on happy thoughts is that, temporarily, they don’t exist. All that was once joyful and light has been squirrelled away deep in the annals of your consciousness, to be uncovered once depression’s done playing it’s sick and twisted game. Sometimes it’s impossible to…

View original post 237 more words

Of Making Many Books, There is No End — or Reward?


Touch2Touch

“Of making many books there is no end, and much study is a weariness of the flesh.”

Ecclesiastes 12

From the Beginning

It was that way right from the beginning, I’m sure. Carvers in stone, makers of runes,  scribes in papyrus and parchment, right up to workaday paper — Hebrew, Greek, Latin, English — Making books is weary WORK, not glamour. Don’t take my word for it; here is Gabriel Garcia Marquezauthor of, among many other long works, One Hundred Years of Solitude and Love in the Time of Cholera:

 “Ultimately literature is nothing but carpentry. Both are very hard work. Writing something is almost as hard as making a table. With both you are working with reality, a material just as hard as wood. Both are full of tricks and techniques. Basically very little magic and a lot of hard work involved.”

Carpentry! But people persist in regarding writing…

View original post 740 more words

Stephen King’s No Joy In E-Book Land


Falls Into Writing

As I’m gearing up to self-publish with both e-book and paperback options, the news breaks today that Stephen King has made the decision to not provide an e-book option for his upcoming book Joyland. In today’s digital age where authors like Neil Gaiman are pushing for change in order to keep up rather than to go extinct, it’s either a bold move or a big financial mistake.

The decision to not include an e-book at all for Joyland makes readers have to purchase the physical book, which is King’s ultimate motive. In a move that shows support for brick-and-mortar stores, the book is available for pre-order as a paperback on Amazon, but a reader can purchase a limited hardback edition through Titan Books. So that may change things slightly as he is not treating the release in the traditional way. Now he’s making the hardback a limited…

View original post 543 more words


letsbuildahome-fr:

IFC Guangzhou | China (by Wilkinson Eyre Architects)

Photographs: Christian Richters, Jonathan Leijonhufvud, Will Pryce

Artistic, aesthetic aspirations and theories about form are in tension with the psychological and social aspects of space, but they are not eclipsed by them. The science of psychology provides some parameters for design without prescribing the end result. When two disciplines meet real innovations can be made. Certain elements of environmental determinism can be usefully combined with a flexible system, which truly evolves with the user.

As a result of this review I would like to set out a modest manifesto. If architects are to design for people they should:

(1)be aware that psychologically healthy spaces need to be flexible enough to allow for individual differences, sub cultural differences and changing needs over time, in order to achieve a sense of ‘place’

(2)be aware of certain core, universal human needs while accepting individual and cultural differences,
(3)avoid writing their own subjective scripts for what they perceive to be psychologically healthy buildings or cities, and

(4)if they can not design ideal spaces for peace and happiness, at least aim to minimize psychological and social harm by understanding how a space gains meaning.