The Lead In Your Pencil


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Europe: Photography and poetry


English: This photograph of Berenice Abbott wa...

English: This photograph of Berenice Abbott was taken by Hank O’Neal at his Downtown Sound Studio in New York City, 18 November 1979 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Relating the concept of space with continuity, movement and time has been the tendency
of historians as early as the 19th century. However, time is not considered as a dimension of
space before the 20th century. Despite Futurist Filippo T. Marinetti who claims

“time and space
died yesterday” (Caws, 2001: 187), space-time becomes a new concept in art and architecture
with the influence of Albert Einstein’s theory of relativity in physics and the mechanical
improvements in technology. Four-dimensional space replaces Euclidean space first in Cubism.
The concept of simultaneity brings forth the coexistence of more than one point of view
expressing aesthetic experience in time. Representation of the visual memory of a moving
observer is preferred to optical vision in Cubist paintings.
Abbott’s subjects were people in the artistic and literary worlds, including French nationals (Jean Cocteau), expatriates (James Joyce), and others just passing through the city. According to Sylvia Beach, “To be ‘done’ by Man Ray or Berenice Abbott meant you rated as somebody”.[9] Abbott’s work was exhibited with that of Man Ray, André Kertész, and others in Paris, in the “Salon de l’Escalier” (more formally, the Premier Salon Indépendant de la Photographie), and on the staircase of the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées. Her portraiture was unusual within exhibitions of modernist photography held in 1928–9 in Brussels and Germany.[10]
In 1925, Man Ray introduced her to Eugène Atget‘s photographs. She became a great admirer of Atget’s work, and managed to persuade him to sit for a portrait in 1927. He died shortly thereafter. While the government acquired much of Atget’s archive — Atget had sold 2,621 negatives in 1920, and his friend and executor André Calmettes sold 2,000 more immediately after his death[11] — Abbott was able to buy the remainder in June 1928, and quickly started work on its promotion. An early tangible result was the 1930 book Atget, photographe de Paris, in which she is described as photo editor. Abbott’s work on Atget’s behalf would continue until her sale of the archive to the Museum of Modern Art in 1968. In addition to her book The World of Atget (1964), she provided the photographs for A Vision of Paris (1963), published a portfolio, Twenty Photographs, and wrote essays.[12] Her sustained efforts helped Atget gain international recognition.

planning to BE AN ARTIST ?


Leonardo da Vinci, drawings of a bird in flight

Leonardo da Vinci, drawings of a bird in flight (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Tracing paper for sketching

For a lot of Sketches document, the most useful reference and the most effective method to learn about sketch is through design tutorials instead of just reading a publication on a particular ARTISTIC language or taking a course of design sessions. Similar to some other type of tutorials, they are created to guide you through the detailed processes to let you see everything you need to undertake to get from beginning to finish. In today’s post, we provide you once again with a new compilation of ‘sketching’ that will really help you when creating a CANVAS from scratch. These description or outline are free to experiment with. Thus, take time to master every procedure so that you will be able to create an effective IN ‘sketching’ without having to spend a great amount of money or assistance of an expert.
Here is essential which provides cool tips in creating a ART. If you are planning to BE AN ARTIST then better browse this post as the description listed below give a simple and faster way to get your CANVAS done while not having to undergo a lengthy process. Have a great time browsing!
• The word ‘drawing’ presents a general term, whereas ‘sketching’ focuses on a specific technique. Both can take the form of an action or object, verb or noun, as each can imply movement. The Oxford English Dictionary defines a sketch as a brief description or outline ‘to give the essential facts or points of, without going into details.’ Sketches document the primary features of something or are considered ‘as preliminary or preparatory to further development’ (1985). Historically, the act of sketching or drawing on paper involves line. At its most basic level, the production of line constitutes making marks with a pointed tool, initiated by movement and force. In reverse, eyes follow a line and with that action the ‘line’s potential to suggest motion is basic’ (Lauer, 1979, p. 151). A line, or mark, made with the bodily action of the hands, demonstrates its ability to cause reflective action, as it attracts the human eye to follow it. This cognition spurs associative thoughts, as the line suggests new forms (Lauer, 1979). Much of the ‘motion’ of a sketch comes from the physical action of the hand; in this way, the tool becomes an extension of the body and reflects the human body. James Gibson, the psychologist and philosopher, writes concerning human contact with a drawing and suggests that making marks is both viewed and felt (1979). The ‘gesture’ of this intimate participation with a sketch gives it meaning and individuality. The control of a hand on the drawing tool yields not a consistent line, but one that is varied, thick or thin. The quality of the mark is important, since individual lines produce association in the minds of architects. Gibson believes, in company with philosophers such as Aristotle, that it is reasonable to suppose that humans can think in terms of images (1982). Conversely, but consistent with his theories of visual perception, there cannot be vision without the cognitive action of thought. Sketches can be analogous for actions that do not involve a mark on paper. For example, a quick skit by a comedian may be deemed a ‘sketch,’ although it does not involve the mark on a surface. Thus, a sketch may be defined by its preliminary and essential qualities. Sketches may also comprise three-dimensional actions preliminary to architecture, such as the fast ‘sketch’ model, or be conceived of digitally as a wire-frame massing in the computer. In such ways, the intention takes precedence over the media. How sketches act to assist design thinking designates their value. As these definitions imply, sketches are notoriously imprecise; valueless physically, and seen as a means to find something or communicate rather than as prized objects in and of themselves. They are usually, but not necessarily, loose and lacking in detail. Some architects make simple but precise diagrams, while others may use sketches purely for communication HOPE WE MAKE SENSE !!! SAY A WORD ABOUT IT AND SHARE WHATS OWN YOUR HEART…


paintings of Skunder Boghossian

paintings of Skunder Boghossian are deeply expressive in a spiritual way where art is

An abstract…

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