Playing with identity and authenticity: Hetain Patel at TEDGlobal 2013


TED Blog

“I don’t know how to introduce this, so I’ll just say, ‘Hetain Patel,'” says TED curator Chris Anderson. So no one knows what to expect, and that’s as may be, because this is some crazy right here.

Patel walks onstage and crouches in a chair next to the dancer Yuyu Rau. He speaks a few sentences in Mandarin, and Rau proceeds to translate. “If I may, I would like to tell you a little bit about myself and my artwork. I was born and raised near Manchester in England, but I’m not going to say it in English to you. I’m trying to avoid any assumptions that might be made from my northern accent.”

It’s at this point that the audience begins to get the sense that something is up. Patel continues: “The only problem with my Chinese Mandarin is I can only speak this one paragraph, which I…

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SEEING THE CITY AS PALIMPSEST – PART III


The artists working for the Timurids were responsible for the development of a true national style of Persian painting. were great patrons of the arts of the book. One of the earliest Timurid paintings in the Burnett collection represents a pair of lovers in a garden, probably Humay and Humayun. It is unusually large, measuring I9 Y by 12 9/6 inches, and comes from the same manuscript of Rashid ad-Din’s Jami at-Tawarikh, or “Universal History,” as the Jonah and the Whale in the Metropolitan Mu-seum.

and those were the reasons

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The peeling paste-up

ONE OF THE MOST POPULAR forms of street art in Melbourne is the paste-up: printed or drawn posters adhered to city walls with a wheat-based glue. The physical insubstantiality of paste-ups renders them particularly ephemeral — they do not have the ‘sticking power’ of paint — yet this also makes them particularly ‘active’ components of the city footprint. The effects of time and human interface are readily wrought upon their surface. Older paste-ups peel away from the walls on which they are stuck; new ones are pasted over them, perhaps in turn to be painted over by following artists, tagged by graffitists, or torn down by council cleaning teams. For artist Miso, the traces of the ‘life’ of the poster are part of its appeal as an art form:

There is a certain excitement in nature and the city reclaiming that piece and the way people interact…

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“He has a pension for fantasy.”


You Knew What I Meant

A simple hearing error.

How often anymore does the typical student encounter the word penchant? Still, somebody she heard had encountered it…or that person had heard it from someone who had encountered it…all the way down into the Quaker Oatmeal box, at some point in which sequence there was a person who actually knew the word was penchant. Whoever heard that person, though, didn’t know the word, and in came “pension.”

How strange it is that college undergraduates would be more likely to know the word “pension” than “penchant.” Are they thinking about retirement before they even enter the ranks of the employed? It’s possible to receive a pension without retiring, as Webster’s first and second variants on definition #1 show: “a fixed sum paid regularly to a person; a gratuity granted (as by a government) as a favor or reward.” But there’s our common understanding, in definition…

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